James Longstreet

Lee's War Horse

By H. J. Eckenrode, Bryan Conrad

Revised Edition

423 pp., 6.125 x 9.125, notes, index

  • Paperback ISBN: 978-0-8078-4799-2
    Published: August 1999
  • eBook ISBN: 978-0-8078-6659-7
    Published: November 2000

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James Longstreet stood with Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson in the great triumvirate of the Army of Northern Virginia. He fought from First Manassas through Appomattox and served as Lee's senior subordinate for most of that time. In this classic work, first published by UNC Press in 1936, H. J. Eckenrode and Bryan Conrad follow Longstreet from his leading role in the military history of the Confederacy through his controversial postwar career and eventual status as an outcast in Southern society. Though they acknowledge his considerable gifts as a corps commander and absolve him of guilt for the Gettysburg debacle, the authors also call attention to the consequences of Longstreet's unbridled ambition, extreme self-confidence, and stubbornness.

About the Authors

H. J. Eckenrode, a Virginian, was a historian of the Virginia Commission on Conservation and Development.
For more information about H. J. Eckenrode, visit the Author Page.

Bryan Conrad, a Virginian, was a historian of the Virginia Commission on Conservation and Development.
For more information about Bryan Conrad, visit the Author Page.

Reviews

"This volume is something more than a biography of Longstreet. It will prove indispensable to students of the Civil War for the new points of view which it opens up and for the fresh light it throws upon many of the incidents."--Times Literary Supplement

"This biography of Lee's 'war horse' is . . . dispassionate and critical. It sets forth, in admirable detail and with scrupulous accuracy, the story of Longstreet's military career."--Henry Steele Commager, New York Herald Tribune

"Should appeal to all students of the Civil War--and even those of us who do not agree with the authors upon every point of their thesis owe them a vote of thanks for producing so conscientious, readable, and thorough a biography of a controversial and largely neglected figure."--Stephen Vincent Benét, Saturday Review