Appalachian Review

Edited by Jason Howard

AR_50-1

Frequency: Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter

Latest Issue: Volume 50, Issue 1

Size: 6 x 9, approx. 130 pages

Bibliographic Information: ISSN: Print 2692-9244; Digital 2692-9244

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In this age of information overload, Appalachian Review strives to be a literary sanctuary for the finest contemporary writing that we can find. Each quarterly issue showcases the work of emerging and established writers throughout Appalachia and beyond, offering readers literature that is thoughtful, innovative, and revelatory.

Founded in 1973 as Appalachian Heritage and based at Berea College since 1985, Appalachian Review considers previously unpublished fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, writing for young adults, craft essays, book reviews, and visual art. In addition to new and emerging writers, contributors to the magazine include finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award; winners of the T. S. Eliot Award, the E.B. White Award, an O. Henry Prize, among others; and multiple Pushcart Prize nominees. Works by contributors have been reprinted in New Stories from the South and other notable anthologies.

Past contributors to Appalachian Review include Pinckney Benedict, Wendell Berry, Wiley Cash, Nikki Giovanni, bell hooks, Silas House, Fenton Johnson, Barbara Kingsolver, Maurice Manning, Ann Pancake, Jayne Anne Phillips, Ron Rash, Lee Smith, Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon, Neela Vaswani, Frank X Walker, and Crystal Wilkinson.

For more information, visit Appalachian Review‘s website, appalachianreview.net.

Jason Howard is the award-winning author, co-author, or editor of three acclaimed books: A Few Honest Words: The Kentucky Roots of Popular Music (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), Something’s Rising: Appalachians Fighting Mountaintop Removal (University Press of Kentucky, 2009), and We All Live Downstream: Writing About Mountaintop Removal (Motes Books, 2009). His numerous essays, features, reviews, and commentary have been widely anthologized and have appeared in The New York Times, The Nation, Sojourners, Equal Justice Magazine, Paste, The Louisville Review, the international magazine Revolve, and on NPR. Widely acknowledged as one of the South’s finest music writers, Howard has interviewed musicians spanning all genres including the iconic Yoko Ono, Dwight Yoakam, Patty Griffin, Naomi Judd, Ricky Skaggs, Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Skinny Deville of Nappy Roots, Caroline Herring, Jay Farrar of Son Volt, jazz pianist Kevin Harris, and legendary folksinger Jean Ritchie. Howard is the co-founder and former creative nonfiction editor of Still: The Journal, Appalachia’s first online literary magazine, and former senior editor of the national publication Equal Justice Magazine. Howard was awarded the 2013 Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship in Creative Nonfiction from the Kentucky Arts Council, and was a finalist for the 2013 Kentucky Literary Award and the 2011 Roosevelt-Ashe Society Outstanding Journalist in Conservation Award. From 2010-2012, he was a James Still Fellow at the University of Kentucky. A southeastern Kentucky native, Howard holds a B.A. in Political Communication from The George Washington University, an M.A. in History from the University of Kentucky, and an MFA in Creative Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts in 2014.

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Masthead

Editor

Jason Howard

Book Reviews Editor

Emily Masters

Student Assistant

Skylar Bensheimer

Manuscript Readers

Katherine Scott Crawford & Patti Frye Meredith

Published Quarterly

by Berea College
CPO 2166
205 N. Main Street
Berea, KY 40404

Table of Contents

Vol. 50, Issue 1

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Jason Kyle Howard

FICTION

Little Piles of Change
by Gavin Colton

Kingsnake
by Christopher Labaza

CREATIVE NONFICTION

Drought Conditions: Personal Accounts from the 2016
Gatlinburg Wildfires
by Jacquelyn Scott

Tiny Towns
by Michael Dowdy

POETRY

‘Ata 1966
Swimming
on migrations
black hole sun
from
how to recognize god’s chosen
by Jeremy Paden

Neptunian Precambric
Kingdom of the Moon
by Rebecca Lilly

I Like to Walk Before the Light
Eastern Cemetery
The Lamp Above My Door

by David S. Higdon

Something in the Water
by Jaycee Billington

Mountain of Nightmares
by Ace Englehart

First Frost
Daylight Savings
by Katy Luxem

Turning the Dogs
by Adam Moore

INTERVIEW

Marianne Worthington
by Jason Kyle Howard

BOOK REVIEWS

CONTRIBUTORS

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