Two Great Rebel Armies

An Essay in Confederate Military History

By Richard M. McMurry

222 pp., 6 x 9, appends., notes, bibl., index

  • Paperback ISBN: 978-0-8078-4569-1
    Published: February 1996
  • eBook ISBN: 978-1-4696-1612-4
    Published: February 2014

Civil War America

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Richard McMurry compares the two largest Confederate armies, assessing why Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was more successful than the Army of Tennessee. His bold conclusion is that Lee's army was a better army--not just one with a better high command.

"Sheds new light on how the South lost the Civil War."--American Historical Review

"McMurry's mastery of the literature is impressive, and his clear and succinct writing style is a pleasure to read. . . . Comparison of the two great rebel armies offers valuable insights into the difficulties of the South's military situation."--Maryland Historian

About the Author

Richard M. McMurry, a historian who lives and works in Roanoke, Virginia, specializes in the history of the Civil War in the West. His books include John Bell Hood and the War for Southern Independence.


For more information about Richard M. McMurry, visit the Author Page.

Reviews

"Sheds new light on how the South lost the Civil War."--American Historical Review

"McMurry offers creative ideas on an old question: why was the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia so much more successful than the Army of Tennessee? . . . Indispensable for all future studies of Confederate military history."--Choice

"McMurry's mastery of the literature is impressive, and his clear and succinct writing style is a pleasure to read. . . . Comparison of the two great rebel armies offers valuable insights into the difficulties of the South's military situation."--Maryland Historian

"Two Great Rebel Armies is that rare treat, a scholarly book that makes for enjoyable reading."--Ohio History

"[McMurry] is one of those remarkable people who combine the talents of a skilled and diligent researcher, a witty and graceful literary style, and a keen appreciation of the milieu of the 1860s."--Florida Historical Quarterly

"Sheer delight. . . . McMurry's splendidly crafted essay is erudite, balanced, witty, and wise."--Raleigh News & Observer